Not sure which Christmas tree to choose? With so many types of to pick from, here's a rundown of which trees smell the best and which are the most durable

Before you set out to find a tree for the holidays, make sure you know what you're looking for.

The focus here is on cut trees.

When picking a tree, make sure you identify when it was cut, as it will make a big difference in terms of longevity and fragrance.

Grand Fir

  • The most fragrant – a combination of citrus and pine
  • Good needle retention – will last three to four weeks after being cut
  • Not for heavy ornaments

Noble Fir

  • Good aroma – very distinctive fir scent
  • The best for needle retention (short and stiff needles) – will last up to six weeks after being cut
  • Great for heavy ornaments
  • Often called "the best Christmas tree"

Fraser Fir

  • Pleasant, sweetened pine-like fragrance
  • Excellent needle retention (second to Noble fir) – can last from U.S. Thanksgiving to New Year's Day
  • For heavier ornaments

Douglas Fir

  • Very fragrant, especially when needles are crushed – citrus and pine
  • Good needle retention – will last three to four weeks after being cut
  • Not for heavy ornaments

Balsam Fir

  • Very fragrant when first cut
  • Very good needle retention

Scotch Pine

  • Good pine aroma lasts for a long time
  • Fair to good needle retention – will last three to four weeks after being cut (dried needles may stay on)
  • Not for heavy ornaments